26th International Ornithological Congress, Tokyo, August 18 – 25, 2014

The bird migration lab attended, this year in Japan, the oldest and most popular congress for ornithologists, the IOC, founded in 1884 in Vienna.

Research institutions from many different countries were represented by enthusiastic senior and young scientists who shared their work in plenary talks, symposia, round tables, and poster sessions. Participation was absolutely astonishing with more than a thousand scientific talks and posters presented and organized in 5 parallel sessions every day. Biogeography and paleontology, evolution and behavioral adaptations, life history, physiology, inmunoecology, social communication, community ecology, reproductive behavior, avian brood parasitism, invasive species, dispersal, migration, bird-human interactions, global change, and conservation were among the main big themes included in the symposia.

The active participation of our lab in the IOC was stricking. Anders P. Tøttrup and Knud A. Jønsson organized a symposium on avian dispersal and implications for speciation, comunity build-up, and migration where Kasper Thorup, Ran Nathan, Knud A. Jønsson, and Flavio Monti presentated their work.

Anders P. Tøttrup and Knud A. Jønsson organized a symposium on dispersal where Kasper Thorup, Ran Nathan, Knud A. Jønsson, and Flavio Monti gave a speech.

Anders P. Tøttrup presenting the symposium on avian dispersal

Ran Nathan gave a talk on dispersal movements in vultures and bats using telemetry

Ran Nathan gave a talk on dispersal using telemetry

Kasper Thorup gave a talk on the response of trans-equatorial migrants to seasonal variation on regional resources across continents

Kasper Thorup showed how migrants follow seasonal changes in resources across continents

Knud A. Jønsson gave on overview on how the knowledge we have nowadays help to understand the dynamics of dispersal and migration

Knud A. Jønsson gave on overview on how the tools available nowadays help to understand the dynamics of dispersal and migration

Other talks given by members of BML and CMEC were on migration and displacements of common cuckoo followed with satellite telemetry by Mikkel Willemoes; how population-specific variation in spatio-temporal migration patterns influence dispersal in migrants by Anders P. Tøttrup, and richness patterns in New World passerine species with latitude by Jon D. Kennedy.

IMG_2352IMG_2271IMG_2286

Other interesting symposium was chaired by Bart Kampenaers from Max Planck Institute of Ornithology about the effect of artificial light in bird behavior and ecology.

Bart Kampenaers presented the symposium on artificial light effect on birds

Bart Kampenaers presented the symposium on artificial light effect on birds

The BML also attended the round table on monitoring of landbirds in eastern Asia and presented the Migrant Landbird Study Group (MLSG). Our purpose in this round table was to promote the MLSG and involve researchers from Asia into this platform for knowledge sharing. We also distributed informative flyers on the MLSG.

One of the aims of the round table on monitoring of landbirds in eastern Asia was to develop standarized methods into the bird monitoring programs

One of the aims of the round table on monitoring of landbirds in eastern Asia was to develop standarized methods for bird monitoring programs

Along the IOC four rooms were used to exhibit posters on research about the themes of the symposia. CMEC and BML were represented once more with two posters on the migration programme in common cuckoo and the wintering area of the red-backed shrike.

Marta L. Vega presented part of her PhD project on the innate component of migration by using satellite telemetry

Marta L. Vega presented the first tracks of young cuckoos followed with satellite telemetry

Lykke Pedersen preseted her work on the red-backed shrike wintering area by using  light level loggers and isotopes in feathers

Lykke Pedersen showed the red-backed shrike wintering area using light-level loggers and isotopes in feather samples

Finally, I would say goodbye for now with some very interesting birds seen during this fantastic trip.

IMG_2151

Tufted puffin, Fratercula cirrhata

Blakiston's fish owl, Bubo blakistoni

Blakiston’s fish owl, Bubo blakistoni

3 thoughts on “26th International Ornithological Congress, Tokyo, August 18 – 25, 2014

    • Thanks! It was very interesting indeed. I was also very happy to see many Asian researchers interested in the cuckoo work. So now, we have new big chance to extend our network to east Asia in the future, probably next year!? 😉

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *